Keynote Speaker

Brian Larkin is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College, Columbia University. He is the author of Signal and Noise: Media, Infrastructure, and Urban Culture in Nigeria (Duke University Press, 2008) and co-editor of Media Worlds: Anthropology on New Terrain (University of California Press, 2002).

Opening Roundtable Discussants
(Media Fields Co-organizers)

Joshua Neves, PhD candidate, Film and Media Studies
Katy Pearce, PhD student, Communication
David Platzer, PhD student, Comparative Literature
Daniel Reynolds, PhD student, Film and Media Studies
Jeff Scheible, PhD candidate, Film and Media Studies
Nicole Starosielski, PhD candidate, Film and Media Studies
(University of California, Santa Barbara)

Closing Roundtable Discussants

Jennifer Earl
Associate Professor of Sociology
Director, Center for Information Technology and Society
University of California, Santa Barbara

Lisa Parks
Chair and Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies
University of California, Santa Barbara

Panel Moderators

Bishnupriya Ghosh
Associate Professor of English
University of California, Santa Barbara

Cristina Venegas
Assistant Professor of Film and Media Studies
University of California, Santa Barbara

Janet Walker
Professor of Film and Media Studies
University of California, Santa Barbara

Charles Wolfe
Professor of Film and Media Studies
University of California, Santa Barbara

Presenters

Ryan Bowles is a PhD student in film and media studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Clint Froehlich is a PhD student in the Department of Cinema & Media Studies at the University of Chicago. He received his B.A. in Visual and Environmental Studies from Harvard College in 2005. His research interests include contemporary American cinema, new media, problems with the post-cinematic, and gender theory.

Ajay Gehlawat
Hutchins School of Liberal Studies
Sonoma State University

I am an Assistant Professor of Theatre and Film with research and teaching interests in South Asian cinema, popular culture, postcolonial studies and film theory. My recent essay, “Kamasutra Bond-ing,” appears in the forthcoming second revised edition of The James Bond Phenomenon: A Critical Reader. Currently I am working on a manuscript focusing on theories of Bollywood and global spectatorship.

Zeynep Gürsel
Michigan Society of Fellows
Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology
University of Michigan

Tom Henthorne
Associate Professor, English/Women’s and Gender Studies
Pace University

Eric Hoyt
Ph.D. Student, Department of Critical Studies
University of Southern California

Mehita Iqani is a final-year PhD Student in Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her research interests include visual methodologies, critical approaches to consumerism and popular culture, theorising the public as a space of appearance, and print media (especially magazines). She is also Founding Editor of online/offline creative submissions magazine, www.itch.co.za.

Ateya Khorakiwala is a master’s student in the History Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art program at MIT working on the intersection of technology and politics in the architecture and public works. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Architecture at the Kamala Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute of Architecture in Mumbai after which she worked on a research fellowship documenting a festival in the city and its use of public space. She is currently working on her master’s thesis that deals with narratives of the nation-state built through infrastructure and public works projects in India in the 1960s and 70s.

Clayton Rosati
Assistant Professor, Telecommunications
Bowling Green State University

Scott Ruston, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Digital Humanities and Media Studies, University of California at Los Angeles. Ruston received his PhD in critical studies from the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California in 2008. Through a combination of theory and practice, his research has explored how the cinematic legacy of the telephone and the unique characteristics of mobile media combine to create immersive and interactive narrative entertainment.

Athena Tan is a PhD student in film and media studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and a co-organizer of Media Fields 2: Infrastructures.

Chris Vasantkumar is the Luce Junior Professor of Asian Studies and Anthropology at Hamilton College. His current research addresses the infrastructures of commensurality that condition the movement of concepts of race, indigeneity and trans/nationalism between China, Taiwan and Tibet.

Steven Witkowski is a graduate student of film and media studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research explores regional specificity in film and television with emphases on site-specific materiality and referentiality.

Meredith Wright
PhD Candidate, Department of French and Italian
University of Texas at Austin